Sunday, February 24, 2013

Inter/transnational “B/black” Migration Clips and Film Recommendations

This wonderful list of films was passed along to us and now we're sharing it here. Many would be great for classes on immigration!

(Language: English and/or Subtitled in English)

  • 18 IUS SOLI (2012) by Fred Kuwornu
    • “18 Ius Soli (The Right of Soil) is a 2012 award-winning grassroots Italian documentary about the issue of citizenship for 1,000,000 kids born in Italy. This documentary examines the law that denies citizenship to young people born in Italy of immigrant parents because they have no Italian blood. It follows 18 stories of girls and boys born and raised in Italy whose parents are originally from African, Asian, and South American countries, but who moved to and have long lived in different areas of Italy.” http://ihousephilly.org/events/18-ius-soli-the-right-of-soil/
    • Trailer: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jMoe0xBzsaw&feature=player_embedded
  • Abouna (Our Father) (2002) by Mahamat-Saleh Haroun
  • (L’)Afrance (2001) by Alain Gomis
    • “El Hadj is studying in Paris. He is one of the young Senegalese men who have come to Paris since the French colony became independent to get a good education so that he can serve his fatherland on his return. Unexpectedly he is suddenly confronted by a problem with his residence papers, just because he has arranged an extension too late. His pleasant life filled with good prospects has gone in one fell swoop.”
    • Trailer: http://www.africanfilmlibrary.com/Movies/Video/5007/987/L'-Afrance
  • African Booty Scratcher (2009) by Nikyatu Jusu
    • “Prom nears and things seem to be spiralling out of control for the typically composed Isatu. In this coming of age story, West African tradition conflicts with American idealism and Isatu is forced to reassess her alliances.”
    • Film: http://vimeo.com/3070606
  • African Voices/BCC
    • “Olivia was born in Ghana and talks about the difficulties she faced when she left the west coast of Africa to start a new life in England”.
    • Film: http://www.bbc.co.uk/1xtra/blackhistory/features/video.shtml
  • Africa For Norway - Official Christmas video
    • Clip: http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=oJLqyuxm96k
  • Afroargentines (2003) by Jorge Fortes & Diego H. Ceballos
    • ““Most Argentines, if you ask, will tell you: ‘In Argentina there are no black people.’” So opens AFROARGENTINES, a film which unearths the hidden history of black people in Argentina and their contributions to Argentine culture and society, from the slaves who fought in the revolutionary wars against Spain, to the contemporary struggles of black Argentines against racism and marginalization. The film uses historical documents from the 18th, 19th, and 20th centuries, but is mostly based on interviews with black Argentines from a variety of backgrounds: intellectuals and taxi drivers, immigrants from Africa and native Afroargentines". http://www.twn.org/catalog/pages/cpage.aspx?rec=1326&card=price
    • Clip: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IkqlKOUUVa4
  • Afropean Film Seminars (2012), Alanna Lockward (Chief Curator)
    • “Afropean Film Seminars are based on the experimental format of BE.BOP 2012. BLACK EUROPE BODY POLITICS, which presented decolonial aesthetics for the first time at outstanding institutions in Europe, such as Goldsmiths University of London, Matadero Madrid, Dutch Art Institute and also in the African continent at Kwazulu Natal Society of Arts, The Bioscope Johannesburg and the National Arts Gallery of Namibia.” http://blackeuropebodypolitics.wordpress.com/afropean-film-seminars/
    • Films: http://afropeanfilmseminars.wordpress.com/screening-room-2/
  • Alles wird gut (Everything Will Be Fine) (1998) by Fatima El-Tayeb and Angelina Maccarone
    • “Nabou, an Afro-German slacker, desperately wants to win back her…ex-girlfriend Katja. Nabou becomes a housekeeper for Katja's neighbor, Kim, who is a workaholic[,] striving to become a partner in an advertising agency. A refreshing romantic comedy with the ingredients of a classic lesbian feature: whimsical sexiness, mistaken identity, and general madness and mayhem”. http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0156523/plotsummary
    • Trailer: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=feojdn5szsc
  • Après l’Océan (2009) by Eliane de Latour
    • “Otho and Shad leave Abidjan for the adventure of Europe. They dream of returning home as great benefactors, heroes. In Spain, a police roundup separates them.
    • Otho, escorted back to the border, returns to his country. He only finds affection and understanding from his sister and a young poet. For everyone else, he becomes an outcast. He's carried away by his projects for an Africa that would believe in itself.
    • Shad pursues his dream of a conquest, no matter the price. He goes to England, where he meets Tango, a Frenchwoman rebelling against society. She takes him to Paris where she still has family that might be able to help them. In turn, Shad introduces Tango to the warm and welcoming milieu of African exiles; she falls in love with Olga and is reconciliated with life. But they must contend with the greed of some African 'brothers', Tango's jealous cousin, administration…” http://en.unifrance.org/movie/25519/apres-l-ocean
    • Trailer: http://www.apreslocean-lefilm.com/
  • Audre Lorde - The Berlin Years 1984 to 1992 (2012) by Dagmar Schultz
    • “Audre Lorde – The Berlin Years 1984 to 1992 focuses on Audre Lorde’s relation to the German Black Diaspora, her literary as well as political influence, and is a unique visual document about the times the author spent in Germany. The film is also for coming generations a valuable historical document of German history, which tells about the development of an Afro-German movement and the origins of the anti-racist movement before and after the German reunification. The film relates the beginnings of these political debates and therefore facilitates a historical analysis and an understanding of present debates on identity and racism in Germany. For the first time, Dagmar Schultz’s archival video- and audio recordings and footage will be made available to a wide public.” http://www.audrelorde-theberlinyears.com/expose.html
    • Trailer: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9mPEkqykAik
  • Back, Africa (1959) by Lionel Rogosin
    • “After witnessing firsthand the terrors of fascism as a soldier in World War II, director Lionel Rogosin vowed to fight against it wherever and whenever he saw its threats reemerging. In an effort to expose “what people try to avoid seeing,” Rogosin travelled to apartheid-struck South Africa and secretly filmed Come Back, Africa, which revealed the cruelty and injustice with which black South Africans were treated…Before beginning the production of Come Back, Africa, Rogosin spent several months touring Africa, becoming accustomed to the way of life in South Africa and acquiring a sense of the apartheid government’s sensitivity to anti-government “conspiracies”–such as the very film he wished to create.” http://comebackafrica.com/about/
    • Trailer: http://comebackafrica.com/trailer/
  • Becoming a Slavery-free Business: Removing Slavery from Product Supply Chains
    • “There’s slavery in every shopping mall in America. From cocoa, coffee and clothing, to cars, computers and cell phones—many products sold in the U.S. are tainted by slavery. Sometimes it’s sweatshop slavery where goods are manufactured. Other times, it’s brutal child slavery at plantations and mines where commodities and raw materials come from. Consumers, investors and regulators want to remove slavery from U.S. store shelves. California has already enacted rules that will soon affect thousands of products sold in America’s most populous state.”
    • Film: https://www.freetheslaves.net/SSLPage.aspx?pid=640
  • Blacks Britannica (1978) by David Koff
    • “…a relentless and engrossing indictment of racism toward black immigrants to England, told from an obvious Marxist perspective. The film argues that discrimination in England is based on economics and fueled by opportunists across the entire spectrum of British politics. Told through the eyes and words of a cross-section of blacks, David Koff's film uses interviews, stock footage, and scenes of street life and violence to show how blacks in England are trapped at the bottom of an economic and political system which shows little compassion or concern about their fate. Rapid editing, overlapping dialogue and cinema verité all build to an emotional and violent climax, whose conclusion is underscored by a reggae band's call for revolution. As Koff puts it, the film "reflects the increasingly militant response within the black community to the continuing attacks upon it, both by the fascist elements on the street and by the state itself." An official of the British Information Service in Washington called the film "dangerous" and asked for equal time. New York Times critic John O'Connor said the film not only documents the growing militancy, "but, quite clearly, the structure and tone endorse it." http://www.ejumpcut.org/archive/onlinessays/JC21folder/BlackUKDreyfuss.html
  • “Black Russians” (2001) by Kara Lynch
    • “Black Russians” is a feature length documentary that investigates the lives of contemporary Afro-Russians aged 10 to 65, born and raised in Soviet Russia. Their experiences chronicle two ideological currents that have shaped major international events in the twentieth century: race and communism. Intimate interviews with a poet, a film producer, a reggae artist, a businessman and others, all Black and all Russian, guide us through this story of promise and non-discrimination. Archive images reveal rarely seen footage of Black political leaders in the Soviet Union, like Paul Robeson, Kwame Nkruma and Angela Davis. More than a decade after the 'fall of communism' a new Russia struggles to steady itself in the wave of nationalism from within and the pressures of global capitalism from without. “Black Russians” constructs a deeply personal account of the effects of political issues such as migration, identity and loss on a minority community in the vast remains of the Soviet Union.” http://www.twn.org/catalog/pages/cpage.aspx?rec=725&card=price
    • Trailer: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3f317flab1E
  • Being Garifuna (2012) by Matthew Orr, Vijai Singh
    • “When it comes to being counted in the census, the Garifunas, who are part African, part Caribbean and part Central American, say they don’t fit into any box.” http://www.nytimes.com/video/2012/01/13/us/100000001285066/being-garifuna.html
    • Trailer: http://www.nytimes.com/video/2012/01/13/us/100000001285066/being-garifuna.html
  • Biutiful (2010) by Alejandro González Iñárritu
    • “Biutiful is a love story between a father and his children. This is the journey of Uxbal, a conflicted man who struggles to reconcile fatherhood, love, spirituality, crime, guilt and mortality amidst the dangerous underworld of modern Barcelona. His livelihood is earned out of bounds, his sacrifices for his children know no bounds. Like life itself, this is a circular tale that ends where it begins. As fate encircles him and thresholds are crossed, a dim, redemptive road brightens, illuminating the inheritances bestowed from father to child, and the paternal guiding hand that navigates life’s corridors, whether bright, bad – or biutiful.” http://www.biutiful-themovie.com/about
    • Trailer: http://www.biutiful-themovie.com/videos
  • Black Deutschland (2006) by Oliver Hardt
    • “The documentary film, Black Deutschland, is an intimate study of how a not so small minority in Germany thinks and feels. It explores how images and counter-images, life-plans and their reflection in the media mutually condition one another. How all of this becomes a social reality in which age-old clichés and prejudices continue to exist quite independent of people's good or bad intentions.” http://www.blackdeutschland.de/note.html?&L=1
    • Trailer: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FIeciLCLRvs&feature=player_embedded
  • Black and Latino (2012)
    • “What does it mean to be black and Latino in the U.S.? Featur[es] interviews with Latino actors Laz Alonso (Avatar, Jumping the Broom), Tatyana Ali (Fresh Prince of Bel Air), Gina Torres (Suits).”
    • Clip: http://www.mun2.tv/candy/original/black-and-latino
  • Black in Latin America (2011) by Henry Louis Gates Jr./PBS
    • “Latin America is often associated with music, monuments and sun, but each of the six countries featured in Black in Latin America including the Dominican Republic, Haiti, Cuba, Brazil, Mexico, and Peru, has a secret history. On his journey, Professor Gates discovers, behind a shared legacy of colonialism and slavery, vivid stories and people marked by African roots. Latin America and the Caribbean have the largest concentration of people with African ancestry outside Africa — up to 70 percent of the population in some countries. The region imported over ten times as many slaves as the United States, and kept them in bondage far longer. On this series of journeys, Professor Gates celebrates the massive influence of millions of people of African descent on the history and culture of Latin America and the Caribbean, and considers why and how their contribution is often forgotten or ignored.” http://www.pbs.org/wnet/black-in-latin-america/about/
    • Trailer: http://www.pbs.org/wnet/black-in-latin-america/featured/preview-black-in-latin-america/172/
  • Black Survivors of the Holocaust (1997) by David Okuefuna and Moise Shewa
    • “This unique film uncovers the torture and murder of Black Germans during the Third Reich. Piecing together experiences of the survivors and the descendants of victims, together with never seen before materials, it documents a moving, if brutal tale of medical experiments. Q&A with the producer Moise Shewa. In conjunction with the Young Professional Cameroonian Network.” http://www.ica.org.uk/Black%20Survivors%20of%20the%20Holocaust+12100.twl
  • Bon Voyage (2005) by Kapwani Kiwanga
    • "In Africa we were dreaming "Paris! Paris!" but when I came here..hhhmmmm. A short three-minute film about a woman's reflections on her immigration to France.” http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rFZ9pakRUdA
    • Film: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rFZ9pakRUdA
  • Brick Lane (2007) by Sarah Gavron
    • “A young Bangladeshi woman, Nazneem, arrives in 1980s London, leaving behind her beloved sister and home, for an arranged marriage and a new life. Trapped within the four walls of her flat in East London, and in a loveless marriage with the middle aged Chanu, she fears her soul is quietly dying. Her sister Hasina, meanwhile, through letters to Nazneed, tells of her carefree life back in Bangladesh, stumbling from one adventure to the next. Nazneen struggles to accept her lifestyle, and keeps her head down in spite of life's blows, but she soon discovers that life cannot be avoided - and is forced to confront it the day that the hotheaded young Karim comes knocking at her door.” http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0940585/plotsummary
    • Trailer: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f8PKMvlUUzQ
  • Brixton riots/BBC
    • “Riots broke out on the streets of south London after a woman was shot and seriously injured in a house search.”
    • Film: http://www.bbc.co.uk/1xtra/blackhistory/features/video.shtml
  • Brown Babies: Deutschlands verlorene kinder (Brown Babies: Germany’s lost children) (2010) by Michaela Kirst
    • “In 1946, the first of the babies fathered by members of the occupying forces are born in war ravaged Germany. Around 5000 of these children have an Afro-American father and a German mother. Many of these ‘Brown Babies’ grow up in Germany. What nobody realises, however, is that many more babies were given up for adoption and subsequently went to live with new, coloured parents in the USA. Both the American and German governments saw this as a convenient solution to an awkward problem, since the very existence of the ‘Brown Babies’ represented a scandal on both sides of the Atlantic. The adopted ‘Brown Babies’ grow up thousands of miles away from their real mothers and the country of their birth. Many of them don’t discover for decades that they have a German mother. Others however, can remember all too clearly the derogatory looks they were subjected to in Germany. Even in the USA, these ‘Brown Babies’ weren’t really accepted anywhere – too dark for the whites and too light for the Afro-Americans…” http://www.tangram-film.de/en/filme/128/
    • Film: http://www.planet-schule.de/sf/php/02_sen01.php?sendung=8704
  • Brown Babies: The Mischlingskinder Story (2011) by Regina Griffin
    • “Brown Babies: The Mischlingskinder Story is a powerful new documentary which tells the story of six so-called “brown babies” born in postwar occupation Germany. They were born to German women and African-American soldiers. As illegitimate, biracial, bicultural children who were unwanted by enemy nations, their lives were tragic. For the first time Brown Babies: The Mischlingskinder Story reveals this little known remarkable piece of history through the compelling life stories of the children and their birth parents.” http://brownbabiesproject.com
    • Trailer: http://brownbabiesproject.com
  • Bronx Princess (2008) by Yoni Brook and Musa Syeed
    • “Bronx Princess follows headstrong 17-year-old teenager Rocky's journey as she leaves behind her mother in New York City to reunite with her father, a chief in Ghana, West Africa. Filmed over the tumultuous summer between high-school and college, Bronx Princess tells Rocky's coming-of-age story. By confronting her immigrant parents' ideas of adulthood, Rocky reconciles her African heritage with her dream of independence.” http://www.bronxprincess.com
    • Trailer: http://www.bronxprincess.com/watch.php
  • Building Bridges: The Untold African Story (2012) by Rose Sackeyfio
    • “This documentary focuses on the ties between Ghana and the African Diaspora. The film highlights modern Ghana as a place of homage for Diaspora peoples through interviews with African Americans who reside there as well as prominent Ghanaians from a cross section of society.” http://www.wssu.edu/about/events/2012/international-week-2012-m.aspx
  • Bye Bye Africa (1999) by Mahamat-Saleh Haroun
    • “In this autobiographical drama, a film director (Mahamet-Saleh Haroun) who was born in Chad but now lives and works in France receives a phone call late one night, with the news that his mother has died. The director goes home for the first time in a decade to discover that he barely recognizes the impoverished land of his birth. His father has little understanding of or respect for his work, so the director decides to make a film in Chad. However, the boom in pirate videotapes had decimated Chad's film industry, and it's all but impossible to secure financing. The director presses on anyway, auditioning local actors and reuniting with his former girlfriend (Aicha Yelena), who appeared in one of his early films, which had negative consequences for her.” http://movies.nytimes.com/movie/201720/Bye-Bye-Africa/overview
  • Caribbean manpower in WW2/BBC
    • “Find out how West Indians were recruited to fight in WW2 and the attitudes towards them after the war was over.”
    • Clip: http://www.bbc.co.uk/1xtra/blackhistory/features/video.shtml
  • Coffee Colored Children (1988) by Ngozi Onwurah
    • “This lyrical, unsettling film conveys the experience of children of mixed racial heritage. Suffering the aggression of racial harassment, a young girl and her brother attempt to wash their skin white with scouring powder. Starkly emotional and visually compelling, this semi-autobiographical testimony to the profound internalized effects of racism and the struggle for self-definition and pride is a powerful catalyst for discussion.” http://www.wmm.com/filmcatalog/pages/c102.shtml
  • (The) Colony (1964) by Philip Donnellan
    • “Filmed at a variety of locations in Birmingham, The Colony was remarkable for its time in giving a voice to working-class settlers from the Carribean. The film uses no narration or commentary, allowing its participants - including a railwayman from St Kitts, a bus conductor from Jamaica, a family of singers from Trinidad and a nurse from Barbados - to speak intelligently and articulately about their experiences of Britain. Most importantly, the film features a very diverse range of views and experiences, demonstrating the absurdity - as one participant points out - of Caribbean immigrants from different countries and very different backgrounds being seen, and coming to see themselves, as a single group. Despite the hostility which many have faced, the interviewees mostly speak with little anger or bitterness. But the England which they find themselves in is not the one they were told about, and they struggle to understand their treatment by the English as foreigners. As one man eloquently puts it, "we call England 'the Mother Country'. We have been taught that it is the Mother Country, it has been drilled into us as the Mother Country, from the cradle, really, to the grave, because... Jamaica has been governed by the English for over three hundred years, and so everything about it is English." http://www.screenonline.org.uk/tv/id/439126/index.html
    • Clip: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N6xfzh3P_YI
  • Coming to America (1988) by John Landis
    • “An African prince goes to Queens, New York City to find a wife whom he can respect for her intelligence and will.” (Note: Recommended as a vehicle for exploring stereotypes and mythologies about Africa among African/Black Americans)
    • Trailer: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vPE4OCeKt2k
  • Dal Puri Diaspora (2012) by Richard Fung
    • “Growing up in Trinidad, Richard Fung loved dal puri roti. In this epic culinary quest he sets out to discover where this spicy flat bread was born. His journey takes him from the central plains of Trinidad to the Bhojpur region of India, and finally to the snowy streets of Toronto, Canada, where he now lives. Eye-opening and richly enjoyable, this film is a fitting tribute to a majestic culinary invention that has traveled the world.” http://www.imdb.com/title/tt2507058/
    • http://exclaim.ca/Reviews/ReelAsian/dal_puri_diaspora-directed_by_richard_fung
    • Trailer: http://www.thestar.com/videozone/1287397--a-roti-how-to
  • Daughters of the Dust (1991) by Julie Dash
    • "Daughters of the Dust" is an African American family heirloom, a gorgeously impressionistic history of the Gullah people set on the South Carolina Sea Islands at the turn of the century. In the hands of director Julie Dash and photographer Arthur Jafa, this nonlinear film becomes visual poetry, a wedding of imagery and rhythm that connects oral tradition with the music video. It is an astonishing, vivid portrait not only of a time and place, but of an era's spirit.” http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/style/longterm/movies/videos/daughtersofthedustnrkempley_a0a2a1.htm
    • Trailer: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c4PEcVK6gbM
  • Dessert Flower (2009) by Sherry Hormann
    • “Desert Flower” follows the true Cinderella-like journey of Waris Dirie, who escaped Somalia at the age of 13 and spent her adolescence as a maid in her country’s London embassy. A regime change forces her onto the streets of London, but she is discovered by a famous fashion photographer, and this scared, homeless runaway evolves into a glamorous runway superstar.” http://movies.nationalgeographic.com/movies/desert-flower/
    • Trailer: http://movies.nationalgeographic.com/movies/desert-flower/
  • Diaspora Conversations: from Goree to Dogon (2000) by Manthia Diawara
    • “Actor Danny Glover and director Manthia Diawara travel through West Africa from Goree to Dogon, creating conversations that link different sides and accounts of the African diaspora. "Diaspora Conversations" traces a journey of memory. Traversing through various locales, they negotiate between the current impact of globalization and the historical questions that both confront and facilitate community. Diawara's prose-like narrative guides the viewer through this video diary that examines the conflicting, yet mutually intersecting, legacies of colonialism and cultural tradition. Both anthropology and recollection, "Diaspora Conversations" travels a terrain that provokes the viewer to interrogate "cultural tourism".” http://www.twn.org/catalog/pages/cpage.aspx?rec=1059&card=price
    • Trailer: http://www.twn.org/catalog/previewwin/gvwin.aspx?pid=141
  • Digital Resources for The Other in World History/John Maunau
    • http://worldhistoryconnected.press.illinois.edu/9.3/maunu.html
  • Dirty Pretty Things (2002) by Stephen Frears
    • “Okwe, a kind-hearted Nigerian doctor, and Senay, a Turkish chambermaid, work at the same West London hotel. The hotel is run by Senor Sneaky and is the sort of place where dirty business like drug dealing and prostitution takes place. However, when Okwe finds a human heart in one of the toilets, he uncovers something far more sinister than just a common crime.” http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0301199/?ref_=fn_al_tt_1
    • Trailer: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t7pb2IClEys
  • Dollars and Dreams: West Africans in New York (2007) by Jeremy Rocklin and Abdel Kader Ouedraogo
    • “Dollars and Dreams is a documentary film focused on the pursuits and challenges of numerous West African immigrants as they confront the idea of the American Dream and the reality of the New York experience. Including additional perspective from scholars, authors, and community leaders, the film creates a vibrant portrait of African achievement throughout the city, while exploring the complicated issues African immigrants face as they balance their deep connections to Africa and their enthusiastic commitments to America.” http://www.der.org/films/dollars-and-dreams.html
    • Trailer: http://www.der.org/films/dollars-and-dreams.html
  • Dreaming Rivers (1988) by Martina Attille
    • “From Sankofa Film and Video comes this bittersweet and nostalgic short drama illustrating the spirit of modern families touched by the experience of migration. Miss T., from the Caribbean, lives alone in her one-room apartment, her children and husband having left her to pursue new dreams. When she dies her family and friends gather at her wake. The tapestry of words that interweave the drama convey the fragments of a life lived, but only partly remembered.” http://www.wmm.com/filmcatalog/pages/c98.shtml
  • E Minha Cara (That’s My Face) (2001) by Thomas Allen Harris
    • “A mythopoetic feast of self-discovery that crosses three continents and three generations, e minha cara traces the filmmaker's journey to Salvador Da Bahia, the African heart and soul of Brazil, as he seeks the identity of the spirits who haunt his dreams. Paralleling the journey his mother made twenty years before to Tanzania in search of a mythic motherland, the film incorporates an innovative sound design that uses rap and hip hop strategies of multi-voice sampling.” http://www.twn.org/catalog/pages/cpage.aspx?rec=1072&card=price
    • Trailer: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=23yu7K_nI0c
  • Eaten by the Heart (2011) by Zina Saro-Wiwa
    • “Eaten By The Heart is a video installation conceived and created by Zina Saro-Wiwa that explores love and intimacy amongst Africans and African diasporic peoples…For this piece, Zina is traveling to different towns and cities in America to conduct interviews with individuals about heartbreak, love and loss, as well as record “kissing performances” with Africans and some African Diasporans. These performances will result in an immersive video installation piece that act as a meditative aid to these questions about the nature of black and African love. The interviews will form part of a documentary series on Love and Africans.” [http://africa.wisc.edu/?page_id=4192]
    • Trailer: http://vimeo.com/54346578
  • Edouard Glissant: One World in Relation (2009) by Manthia Diawara
    • “In 2009, Manthia Diawara, with his camera, followed Edouard Glissant on the Queen Mary II in a cross-Atlantic journey from South Hampton (UK) to Brooklyn (New York). This poetic meditation continued in Martinique, the native home of Edouard Glissant. The extraordinary voyages resulted in the production of an intellectual biography in which Glissant elaborates on his theory of Relation and the concept of “Tout-monde.” Edouard Glissant was one of the most important contemporary thinkers. In the 1980s, his theories of creolization, diversity and otherness, as elaborated in the book "Le Discours Antillais" (1981), were considered as seminal texts for the emerging studies of multiculturalism, identity politics, minority literature and Black Atlanticsim. In the 1990s and 2000, he developed a theory he called "Poetique de la relation," and "Tout-Monde," where the concept of "Relation" is perceived as an autonomous entity, moving between objects and providing them with energy, poesis and difference. In his book "Philosophie de la relation", Glissant used the concept to meditate on the new meanings of globalization, chaos, violence, equality and justice.” http://www.twn.org/catalog/pages/cpage.aspx?rec=1299&card=price
    • Trailer: http://www.twn.org/catalog/previewwin/gvwin.aspx?pid=258
  • Empire Windrush arrival/BBC
    • “Watch the first post-war Caribbean settlers as they step foot in Britain for the first time. Hear calypsonian icon Lord Kitchener's infamous "London is de place for me."
    • Film: http://www.bbc.co.uk/1xtra/blackhistory/features/video.shtml
  • Entre les murs (The Class) (2008) by Laurent Cantet
    • “[The film] is based on the 2006 novel of the same name by François Bégaudeau. The novel is a semi-autobiographical account of Bégaudeau's experiences as a French language and literature teacher in a middle school in the 20th arrondissement of Paris, particularly illuminating his struggles with "problem children" Esmerelda (Esmeralda Ouertani), Khoumba (Rachel Regulier), and Souleymane (Franck Keïta). The film stars Bégaudeau himself in the role of the teacher.” http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Class_%282008_film%29
    • Trailer: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t8HWJqgMAhU
  • Eritrean refugee in Rome (2012?)
    • Clip: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_mqv4tSd9p8
  • Exodus (2001) by Sorious Samura
    • “Sorious Samura follows migrants from West African countries as they set out to breach the walls of Fortress Europe. They face death in a desert journey across the Sahara, before an equally hazardous voyage across the sea to Spain. The refugees willingly risk death to build a new future for themselves because they don't see one in Africa. Sorious attempts to understand why they feel there is no hope for them in Sierra Leone, Liberia, Nigeria. He asks why they think Europe, if they survive their perilous journey, will have more to offer them.” http://www.insightnewstv.com/exodus/
    • Clip: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rHzDeCROqW8
  • Fire Eyes (1994) by Soraya Mire
    • “Fire Eyes is the voice of the wounded souls, communicating the anguish and the pain, of the harmful practice of Female Genital Mutilation/female circumcision in Africa, which has affected almost 80 million women in Africa, 135 million women around the world. The film maker had gone through this Rite of Passage when she was 13, and lived with the scar and trauma since then.”
    • Film: http://www.cultureunplugged.com/play/1554/Fire-Eyes
  • För Kärleken (For Alice) (2010)
    • “An African man on the verge of an economical breakdown, a stressed businesswoman, a former TV-star and a struggling father among the cast. These peoples' individual stories are later melted into one, when they by a chance are involved in a car accident.” http://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/for_karleken/
  • (The) Forgotten Refugees of Eritrea (in Sudan)
    • Clip: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qbJ-E9o6lcU
  • (From) Mambo to Hip Hop: A South Bronx Tale (2006) by Henri Chalfant
    • “From Mambo to Hip-Hop” dances through the history of a borough that nurtured two musical movements: the mambo that evolved into salsa, and the hip-hop that arose from the most desperate days of the South Bronx.” New York Times.” http://movies.nytimes.com/2006/09/14/arts/television/14pare.html?_r=0
    • Trailer: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=72WK_7zfQYo
  • Forward Home (2011) by Lisa Wickham
    • “A documentary film, shot in 9 countries, revealing the economic power of the people of the Caribbean Diaspora living in global cities; the significance of their contribution to their homeland, as travelers and entrepreneurs. Locations: London, Toronto, Amsterdam, Rotterdam, The Hague, Suriname, New York, Jamaica, Guyana, Barbados, Trinidad and Tobago.” http://www.imdb.com/title/tt2177555/
    • Trailer: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cj0vLkUyRtU
  • Ghosts of Cité Soleil (2006) by Asger Leth
    • “During the embattled final months of Jean-Bertrand Aristide's second term as president of Haiti, Aristide's allies recruited street gangs from the nation's poorest cities to act as strong-arm men, helping to shut down resistance to Aristide and quiet those who opposed him. Called chimères (or "ghosts"), these gang-bangers became a powerful part of Aristide's forces until the president was removed from office by a coup d'etat in 2004. Dutch filmmaker Asger Leth combines mockumentary reenactments with footage shot in the ghettos of Cité Soleil during Aristide's final days in this powerful drama that follows two brothers and chimères, Billy (James Petit Frere) and 2Pac (Winson Jean)…Ghosts of Cité Soleil features a musical score by Wyclef Jean of the Fugees, who also appears in the film in a scene in which he discusses music and politics with 2Pac.” http://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/ghosts_of_cite_soleil/
    • Trailer: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y8Ow-Uh0ZtI
  • Go-Bama: Between Hope and Dreams (2010) by Rahman Satti
    • “An uplifting fly-on-the-wall documentary that portrays the monumental time of change during the Obama campaign that led up to his presidency in 2008. This film interweaves complex cultural questions with the director’s biographical legacy and becomes a source of renewed inspiration reconciling the personal and universal dream for a better world. We follow filmmaker Satti, born to a German mother and Sudanese father and raised behind the Iron Curtain in East Germany, as he embarks on a quest following the Obama campaign to find hope again. On this epic journey, Satti encounters varied and charismatic people that give us deep insights into the political expectations that led to the Barack Obama Presidency. Satti’s initial skepticism is often overwhelmed by the enthusiasm and spirit of the American people; nevertheless he dares to ask: “Can we really resurrect our lost hopes and dreams?” http://www.sattiandsatti.com/trailer.html
    • Trailer: http://www.sattiandsatti.com/trailer.html
  • God Grew Tired Of Us (2006) by Christopher Dillon Quinn, Tommy Walker
    • “In 1987, Sudan's Muslim government pronounced death to all males in the Christian south: 27,000 boys fled to Ethiopia on foot. In 1991, they were forced to flee to Kenya; 12,000 survived to live in a U.N. camp in Kakuma. Archival footage documents the 1,000 mile flight; we see life in the camp. We follow three young men who repatriate to the U.S. John Bul Dau goes to Syracuse, and by the film's end, becomes a spokesperson for the Lost Boys and Lost Girls of Sudan; Daniel Abol Pach and Panther Bior go to Pittsburgh. All work several jobs, send money back to the camp, search for relatives lost in the civil war, acclimatize to the U.S., seek an education, and miss their homeland.” http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0301555/
    • Trailer: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0301555/
  • Handsworth Songs (1987) by John Akomfrah
    • “An experimental film essay on race and disorder in Britain, filmed in Handsworth and London during the riots of 1985 and incorporating newsreel and archival material.” http://www.screenonline.org.uk/film/id/441093/index.html
  • Home Again (2012) by David Sutherland and Jennifer Holness
    • “Marva, Dunston, and Everton grew up in Toronto, New York and London, respectively but are deported ‘home’ to Jamaica. Once in Kingston they discover every day is a fight for survival where family support, friendships, and shelter are elusive. They embark on a journey that pushes their endurance beyond measure and forces them to discover who they truly are. A searing, fast paced drama, Home Again asks the question, “How would you survive?” Never before has the story of deportees been told cinematically.” http://www.homeagainfilm.com/#/home/
    • Trailer: http://www.homeagainfilm.com/#/media/
  • Home Away From Home (1994) by Maureen Blackwood
    • “A bittersweet drama that unfolds almost without dialogue, this prizewinning short film from Sankofa Film and Video conveys the isolation of immigrant women’s experiences. Miriam lives with her children in a cramped and dreary house near the airport where she works. The planes coming and going overhead remind her of how far removed she is from her rural African roots.” http://www.wmm.com/filmcatalog/pages/c97.shtml
  • I Am an American -The Movie
    • Trailer: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p68q5Fe3QSU
  • (The) Italian Solution for Immigrants (2011)
    • “Thanks to strict new laws turning unauthorised migration into a criminal offence and a controversial deal with Libya, Italy is cracking down on immigration. Tough but necessary or just plain racist? … Negative press has turned immigration into a devil in the public’s eye but it seems Italians no longer need to fear: the government has closed the gateway to Europe. Libya is preventing migrants from leaving and Italy's pushing back boats intercepted near Lampedusa. The need for political asylum is not considered. Most drastically, doctors are now obliged to report migrants without documents to the authorities...”
    • Clip: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BgLW_b_Sl2E
  • Jamaicans come to Britain to Look for Work (1948) with an inaugural performance of 'London is the Place for Me' by Lord Kitchener, British Pathé (start ~47 mins)
    • “Long shot of the ship "Empire Windrush" arriving at Tilbury docks. Angle shot, Jamaican immigrants looking over ship's rail. Four Jamaican men reading newspaper. Several shots of group of Jamaicans on ship. Good panning shot along the crowd. Top view, Pathe reporter John Parsons interviewing one of the Jamaicans on ship (natural sound). Close up, top view of John Parsons interviewing another immigrant. Pathe cameraman on truck, men looking over ships rail in background.” http://www.britishpathe.com/video/pathe-reporter-meets/query/Lord+Kitchener++windrush
    • Clip: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dGt21q1AjuI
  • Kevin Bales: Slavery in the New Global Economy/Fora.tv
    • Clip: http://fora.tv/2007/11/01/Kevin_Bales_Slavery_in_the_New_Global_Economy
  • (The) Lateral Moves of African American studies in a Period of Migration (2006)/Cornell University. Africana Studies and Research Center (DVD)
    • “Roderick Ferguson's lecture focuses on the meaning of Caribbean and African American migration to African American studies. He talks about the pressure it exerts on the discipline. He provides a critique from a feminist/queer perspective.” http://www.worldcat.org/title/lateral-moves-of-african-american-studies-in-a-period-of-migration/oclc/070239929
  • Leaving Jamaica/BCC
    • “Claudette came to the UK 30 years [ago] when she was only 13 years old. She had to move halfway across the world to live with her mother who she hadn't seen since she was a small child.”
    • Film: http://www.bbc.co.uk/1xtra/blackhistory/features/video.shtml
  • (The) Letter: An American Town and the 'Somali Invasion' (2003) by Ziad H. Hamzeh
    • “In the wake of the 9/11 tragedy a firestorm erupts when Mayor Larry Raymond of Lewiston, Maine sends a letter to 1,100 newly arrived Somali refugees advising that the city's resources are strained to the limit and asking that other Somalis not to move to the city. Interpreted as racism by some and a rallying cry by white supremacist groups across the United States, THE LETTER documents the crossfire of emotions and events, culminating in a "hate" rally convened by The World Church of the Creator and a counter "peace" rally involving 4,000 Lewiston residents supporting ethnic and cultural diversity.” http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0383460/
    • Trailer: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0383460/
  • Little Senegal (2001) by Rachid Bouchareb
    • “A man goes on a pilgrimage in search of his heritage -- only this time it's an African coming to America in this offbeat drama. Alloune (Sotigui Kouyate) is an elderly man who works at a museum in his native Senegal that is devoted to documenting the history of the slave trade in Africa. Many people come to the museum hoping to learn about their past, and Alloune is equally curious about his own heritage, and his research into his family tree suggests that he had several relatives who were kidnapped and sold to slave traders working out of South Carolina. Alloune decides to visit America to learn more about his kin…” http://movies.nytimes.com/movie/239416/Little-Senegal/overview
    • Trailer: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iGPs18G9l_E
  • Living with Illegals (2006) by Sorious Samura
    • “…[J]ournalist Sorious Samura lives the life of an “illegal” immigrant, in an attempt to fully experience the reality of being one. Traveling over 1,000 miles in four weeks, living through the exact same conditions, experiences and grueling hardships as his companions, his journey is epic, as he travels from Morocco into Europe through Spain and France, finally crossing the English Channel to Britain. Samura begins In Northern Morocco, where hundreds of illegal immigrants live in forests waiting for their chance to break into the enclave of Ceuta, a Spanish enclave at the very tip of Africa. For them, Europe means work -- as one says, "I am ready to do any kind of job. If I have to I'll wash the toilets, bathrooms or train stations and I'll be very happy. Forget I am a graduate." http://articles.cnn.com/2006-08-04/world/samura.story_1_immigrants-struggle-hundreds-of-illegal-immigrants-ceuta?_s=PM:WORLD
    • Clip: http://vimeo.com/40400026
  • London River (2009) by Rachid Bouchareb
    • “Set against the backdrop of the 7/7 attacks, London River follows Elizabeth … from a small farming community in Guernsey, as she travels to London in the immediate aftermath of the bombings after failing to hear from her daughter. Elizabeth is disturbed by the confusion of the metropolis and above all by the predominantly Muslim neighbourhood where her daughter lived. Her fear and prejudice escalate when she discovers her daughter was converting to Islam and keeps crossing paths with Ousmane (Sotigui Kouyaté), a West African who has come from France to find his missing son.” http://www.londonrivermovie.com/
    • Trailer: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1227787/
  • Lost Boys of Sudan (2004) by Megan Mylan and John Shenk
    • “Lost Boys of Sudan is an Emmy-nominated feature-length documentary that follows two Sudanese refugees on an extraordinary journey from Africa to America. Orphaned as young boys in one of Africa's cruelest civil wars, Peter Dut and Santino Chuor survived lion attacks and militia gunfire to reach a refugee camp in Kenya along with thousands of other children. From there, remarkably, they were chosen to come to America. Safe at last from physical danger and hunger, a world away from home, they find themselves confronted with the abundance and alienation of contemporary American suburbia.”
    • Trailer: http://www.lostboysfilm.com/about.html
  • Me Broni Ba (2009) by Akosua Adoma Owusu
    • “Me Broni Ba is a lyrical portrait of hair salons in Kumasi, Ghana. The tangled legacy of European colonialism in Africa is evoked through images of women practicing hair braiding on discarded white baby dolls from the West. The film unfolds through a series of vignettes, set against a child's story of migrating from Ghana to the United States. The film uncovers the meaning behind the Akan term of endearment, me broni ba, which means “my white baby.” http://www.mebroniba.com
    • Trailer: http://www.mebroniba.com/trailer.html
  • Mister Johnson (1990) by Bruce Beresford
    • “In 1923 British Colonial Nigeria, Mister Johnson is an oddity -- an educated black man who doesn't really fit in with the natives or the British. He works for the local British magistrate, and considers himself English, though he has never been to England. He is always scheming, trying to get ahead, which lands him in a lot of hot water.” http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0102458/
    • Trailer: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RE5EdZ7WSoE
  • Mixed relationships/BCC
    • “The arrival of West Indians in the UK meant that there were many more mixed race relationships. Watch one couple's struggle for acceptance.”
    • Film: http://www.bbc.co.uk/1xtra/blackhistory/features/video.shtml
  • Mrs. Goundo's Daughter (2009) by Barbara Attie and Janet Goldwater
    • “Mrs. Goundo is fighting to remain in the United States. But it’s not just because of the ethnic conflict and drought that has plagued her native Mali. Threatened with deportation, her two-year-old daughter could be forced to undergo female genital mutilation (FGM... Using rarely cited grounds for political asylum, Goundo must convince an immigration judge that her daughter is in danger. Sensitive and moving, this important film reveals how women are profoundly affected by the legal struggles surrounding immigration.” http://www.wmm.com/filmcatalog/pages/c757.shtml
    • Trailer: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-sou4Iw69eQ
  • My American Girls: A Dominican Story (2001) by Aaron Matthews
    • “In vivid vérité detail, My American Girls: A Dominican Story captures the joys and struggles over a year in the lives of the Ortiz family, first generation immigrants from the Dominican Republic. Matthews' film captures the rewards — and costs — of pursuing the American dream. From hard-working parents, who imagine retiring to their rural homeland, to fast-tracking American-born daughters, caught between their parent's values and their own, the film encompasses the contradictions of contemporary immigrant life.” http://www.pbs.org/pov/myamericangirls/#.UMSYhqV5nFI
    • Trailer: http://www.pbs.org/pov/myamericangirls/#.UMSYhqV5nFI
  • Nadin Khoury (2011)
    • “Nadin Khoury, a 13-year-old son of Liberian immigrants living in Philadelphia, was viciously attacked, beaten and terrorized by a group of seven young men while on his way home from school. He was jumped, kicked, punched, stuffed in a tree and ultimately hung from a fence outside of his apartment complex, and as often happens these days, one of the alleged attackers filmed the assualt and later posted the incident on YouTube.” http://www.bvblackspin.com/2011/02/02/13-year-old-nadin-khoury-violently-attacked-by-teen-wolf-pack/
    • Clip: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RByLNIcXZuE
  • Negro: 'Pelo Malo' (2012)
    • “The implications and dynamics of 'pelo malo' or bad hair and good hair are examined by women and men from all over the Americas and Africa. What do these terms mean? How are they interpreted and ultimately what attitudes do they reflect?”
    • Clip: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N5TtheqDTeY
  • (The) Neo-African-Americans (2009) by Kobina Aidoo
    • “The Neo-African Americans explores how rapid, voluntary immigration from Africa, the Caribbean and Latin America is transforming the "African-American" narrative”
    • Trailer: http://neoafricanamericans.wordpress.com/
  • Niggas in Paris made in Paris (2012) by Ibrahim Koudié
    • “Using the "Ni**as in Paris" soundtrack, the video features a sequence of known and unknown black people, in their own universe. The goal is to show that this diversity is a driving force in creating the unique charm & atmosphere that the city of lights exudes. Authentic and original/innovative, this video is a fresh take on a song that has quickly become a classic and serves as a great notice to Jay-Z and Kanye's upcoming visit to Paris.
    • With this video, the + l'infini's team hopes to transcend the cultural and social differences of our worlds and cement a link between the American and French Black communities.”
    • Clip: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uHxsgkEqrBU
  • (La) Noire de…(Black Girl) (1966) by Ousmane Sembene
    • “A Senegalese woman is eager to find a better life abroad. She takes a job as a governess for a French family, but finds her duties reduced to those of a maid after the family moves from Dakar to the south of France. In her new country, the woman is constantly made aware of her race and mistreated by her employers. Her hope for better times turns to disillusionment and she falls into isolation and despair. The harsh treatment leads her to consider suicide the only way out.” http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0060758/?ref_=fn_al_tt_1
    • Film: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y42w0f1jqRg
  • On the map (2008) by Annalee Davis
    • “On the Map debunks the myth of a unified, “laid back” Caribbean culture by exposing how Caribbean people treat themselves as “other.” By questioning the notion of a merged Caribbean, the film asks difficult questions: Have regional institutions failed to advance integration? Will political leaders sacrifice sovereign power for a shared power under increasing regional governance? Is the CSME interested in the lives and dreams of poor, unskilled Caribbean nationals? Includes interviews with: Mas man Peter Minshall; poet Kamau Brathwaite; playwright/performer Michael Gilkes; and, musician Wendell Manwarren, among others.” http://caribbeantales-worldwide.com/catalogue/documentaries/on-the-map-2/
    • Trailer: http://caribbeantales-worldwide.com/catalogue/documentaries/on-the-map-2/
  • One Hundred Men (2007) by Daniel Yon
    • “[This] film documents the story of one hundred men who, in 1949, were recruited from the Island of St Helena in the South Atlantic to work as agricultural labourers in England. It weaves archival sources together with conversations with some of the surviving men, their respective wives, a daughter and an Oxfordshire farmer. A range of themes invoked by this unusual moment of migration within the British world - to do with race, identity, citizenship, and the meaning of Britishness- are explored through first-hand accounts and archival sources.” http://www.saw-productions.com/node/2
    • Clip: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LwDROGXbX30
  • Open Souls (2011) by Volker Meyer-Dabisch
    • “In 1954 and 1955, two boys were born in a women's prison in Germany. Besides being born to mothers who have been convicted of a crime, they have one additional 'blemish': they are the children of U.S. soldiers. An insight into the life of these men, and into one of the last taboos of post war times: the fight for acceptance and identity of a mixed person in Germany.” http://movies.nytimes.com/movie/467477/Open-Souls-tmdU-/overview
    • Trailer: http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=c8yopWylTdc
  • Osuofia in London
    • “Osuofia in London is arguably the most popular Nollywood movie that tells the hilarious tale of Osuofia, a villager, who goes to London to collect an inheritance his late brother left him.” http://www.victolavideos.com/english-movies/osuofia-in-london-part-1
    • Clips: http://www.youtube.com/channel/HCEdauIKcLkfQ
  • Otomo (1999) by Frieder Schlaich
    • “The true story of Otomo, a black man seeking work and asylum in the German city of Stuttgart. However, all he finds is racism, police trouble and his final destiny.” http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0204527/?ref_=fn_al_tt_1
    • Trailer: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nP9SLVz3ZEo
  • Out of Africa – Spain (2007)
    • “…Every day, an armada of tiny flotillas brave the 11 day journey from West Africa to the Canaries. "So far today, we've had 293 arrivals. Several needed medical attention for serious wounds", states Oswaldo Lemus from the Red Cross. Under Spanish law, these men can only be detained for 40 days. If their nationality cannot be established in that period, they are released into the local community. But authorities here are being stretched to breaking point and calls are growing for the immigration laws to be reviewed…Everyone knows someone who did not make the crossing. "Here, young people have no future", complains Alkally Sarr. He's already survived the journey once, only to be deported. But he's vowed to; "try again. For as long as I live".
    • Clip: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O6DYxxvzKBI
  • Panama Canal/PBS
    • “On August 15th, 1914, the Panama Canal opened, connecting the world’s two largest oceans and signaling America’s emergence as a global superpower. American ingenuity and innovation had succeeded where, just a few years earlier, the French had failed disastrously. But the U.S. paid a price for victory.”
    • Film: http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/americanexperience/films/panama/player/
  • Parcours de Dissidents (The Dissident’s Journey) (2006) by Euzhan Palcy
    • “Through interviews with the men and women of the resistance movement in Martinique and Guadeloupe during World War II, Palcy recounts the story of a forgotten generation of West Indian patriots. Escaping the collaborationist government of the islands, they traveled in makeshift boats to the British Isles, trained in the United States, and fought as a battalion in North Africa. Thanks in part to the documentary’s uncovering of this previously untold story, in 2009 French President Nicolas Sarkozy bestowed the Legion of Honor upon the "dissidents." http://www.moma.org/visit/calendar/film_screenings/12396
    • http://www.euzhanpalcy.co/Filmography.html
  • Pelo Bueno vs Pelo Malo/Good Hair vs. Bad Hair (2012): Workshop at the 4th Annual National Dominican Student Conference at Cornell
    • “This workshop explores the root behind the "Pelo Bueno, Pelo Malo" controversy. Questions including, but not limited to, "Is it more than just about hair? Is this more about looking less "black"? and "What is beauty or rather a Dominican's definition of beauty?" will be discussed. This workshop will also examine racial tensions between Haiti and the Dominican Republic and what we, as students, can do to ameliorate this problem.” http://4thnationaldominicanstudentconference.eventbrite.com/
    • Clip: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eH6AELlx9nk
  • (La) Playa D.C. (2012) by Juan Andrés Arango Garcia
    • “Tomas, an Afro-Colombian teenager who fled the country's Pacific coast pushed out by the war, faces the difficulties of growing up in a city if exclusion and racism. When Jairo, his younger brother and closest friend disappears, Tomas plunges in the streets of the city. His search becomes an initiatory journey that compels him to face his past and to leave aside the influence of his is brothers in order to find his own identity. Through this journey, Tomas reveals a unique perspective of a vibrant and unstable city that, like Tomas, stands on the threshold between what once was and what might be.” http://www.imdb.com/title/tt2369025/plotsummary
    • Trailer: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=swlB3Usv6DQ&feature=player_embedded
  • Pressure (1975) by Horace Ové
    • “A dramatisation of the tensions that exist between first and second generation West Indian immigrants in the Notting Hill area of London. Set in Ladbroke Grove, West London, an area with a large Caribbean population since the 1950s, Pressure (d. Horace Ové, 1975) explores the assimilation (or otherwise) of Caribbean people into British society.” http://www.screenonline.org.uk/film/id/480497/index.html
    • Trailer: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9-JqA1zg0Uw
  • Prince of Broadway (2008) by Sean Baker
    • “Prince of Broadway is the story of Lucky and Levon, two men whose lives converge in the underbelly of New York's wholesale fashion district. Lucky, an illegal immigrant from Ghana, makes ends meet by soliciting shoppers on the street with knock-off brand merchandise. Levon, a Armenian-Lebanese immigrant, operates an illegal storefront with a concealed back room where counterfeit goods are showcased to interested shoppers. Lucky's world is suddenly turned upside down when a child is thrust into his life by a woman who insists the toddler is his son. While Lucky copes with his new domestic dilemma, Levon struggles to save a marriage that is falling apart.” http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1000769/
    • Clip: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1000769/
  • (La) Promesse (1996)
    • “Igor and his father, Roger, are making a decent living renting apartments to illegal immigrants and sometimes working them illegally (among other scams). But when the building inspector pays a surprise visit and Amidou falls off a scaffold in his hurry to hide, things start to unravel, particularly when Igor makes a promise to the injured Amidou that ultimately exposes the different values of Igor and Roger, and of Amidou's wife, Assita.” http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0117398/plotsummary
    • Trailer: http://mubi.com/films/la-promesse
  • Pushing the Elephant (2010) by Beth Davenport and Elizabeth Mandel
    • “In the late 1990s, Rose Mapendo was imprisoned with her family during violence that engulfed the Democratic Republic of Congo. Her harrowing experience included the nighttime arrest of her entire family by government agents, the execution of her husband, the birth of their twin sons in prison, and grim negotiations with prison guards to save the lives of her children. She emerged from the harrowing experience advocating forgiveness and reconciliation...” http://itvs.org/films/pushing-the-elephant
    • Trailer: http://itvs.org/films/pushing-the-elephant
  • Rain in a Dry Land (2007) by Anne Makepeace
    • “How do you measure the distance from an African village to an American city? What does it mean to be a refugee in today's "global village"? Rain in a Dry Land provides eye-opening answers as it chronicles the fortunes of two Somali Bantu families, transported by relief agencies from years of civil war and refugee life to Springfield, Massachusetts and Atlanta, Georgia. As the newcomers confront racism, poverty and 21st-century culture shock, the film captures their efforts to survive in America and create a safe haven for their war-torn families.”
    • Trailer: http://www.pbs.org/pov/raininadryland/#.UM-zQXfAGSo
  • (A) Raisin in the Sun (1961) by Daniel Petrie (2008) by Kenny Leon
    • “Walter Lee Younger is a young man struggling with his station in life. Sharing a tiny apartment with his wife, son, sister and mother, he seems like an imprisoned man. Until, that is, the family gets an unexpected financial windfall...” B ased on the play by Lorraine Hansberry. [Note: Of particular interest is the relationship and dialogue between Beneatha and Asagi, her Nigerian friend.] http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0055353/?ref_=fn_al_tt_2
    • Trailer: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BFnUn70EDoA&playnext=1&list=PL87E3941D9273E853
    • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hip2vqM7Wdg
  • Restless City (2011) by Andrew Dosunmu
    • “Restless City tells the story of an African immigrant surviving on the fringes of New York City where music is his passion, life is a hustle, and falling in love is his greatest risk.” http://restlesscityfilm.com/#about
    • Trailer: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jMkMEaHeVp8
  • Robots of Brixton (2011) by Kibwe Tavares
    • “The film follows the trials and tribulations of young robots surviving at the sharp end of inner city life, living the predictable existence of a populous hemmed in by poverty, disillusionment and mass unemployment. When the Police invade the one space which the robots can call their own, the fierce and strained relationship between the two sides explodes into an outbreak of violence echoing that of 1981.” http://vimeo.com/25092596
    • Clip: http://vimeo.com/25092596
    • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GVLjqanqqVU&feature=player_embedded#!
  • Roots Germania (2007) by Mo Asumang
    • “The journey of the afro-german Mo Asumang started when she first heard the song that called for her murder “This bullet is for you, Mo Asumang” sang by the Neonaziband “White Aryan Rebels”. Instead of hiding Mo was driven by her desire to overcome her fears and to find out where this hate against Migrants and where Racism comes from...” http://www.mo-asumang-management.com/dokus--roots-germania.html
    • Trailer: http://www.mo-asumang-management.com/dokus--roots-germania.html
    • http://vimeo.com/19249458
  • Rue Cases Nègres (Sugar Cane Alley) (1983) by Euzhan Palcy
    • “Set in 1931, Sugar Cane Alley paints a rich impasto of native life under French colonial rules, filtered through the coming-of-age of a bright, sweetly opportunistic boy learning to reconcile the value of his shanty-town roots with the education opportunities that beckon him to the big city.” http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0086213/plotsummary
    • Trailer: http://www.videodetective.com/movies/sugar-cane-alley/909
  • Saidi's Song (2010) by Chike Kani Omo
    • “Each city has its shadows, the world of underground migrants where dreams are a luxury, reality is a nightmare and you do whatever it takes to survive. Faith, love and trust become mare currency bringing out the best and worst in all. A searching survival drama that promises to question the very core of what you believe is possible, with faith…”
    • Trailer: http://vimeo.com/14304662
  • Schwarzfahrer (Black Rider) (1993) by Pepe Danquart
    • “Schwarzfahrer is a black and white film about an incident of colour related racism on a tram in Germany: An elderly lady launches into a tirade of verbal abuse against an African American passenger, bringing up a whole host of prejudices against asylum-seekers and immigrants. The other passengers eavesdrop, but don’t intervene. When the ticket inspector turns up to check everyone’s tickets something unexpected occurs and the tables turn…” http://danquart.de/en/projects/schwarzfahrer-black-rider
    • Film: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XFQXcv1k9OM
  • Small Island (2010), PBS, based on the novel by Andrea Levy
    • “Hortense Joseph arrives in London at Queenie Bligh's house to live with her new husband Gilbert Joseph; a man she only married to fulfill her dream of leaving Jamaica to live in England. Dismayed by Gilbert's dingy attic room, she pauses to remember Michael, her first love in Jamaica, and his betrayal that led them to be banished from their childhood home on the eve of war. Queenie, meanwhile, reflects on her own unsatisfactory marriage to dull Bernard and a passionate meeting with a Jamaican Royal Air Force airman during the Blitz. Gilbert remembers his desperation to leave Jamaica and fight for the mother country, and then his meeting Queenie in Yorkshire, and the tragic shooting that separated them. Now in 1948, their lives converge in London and their long-held secrets threaten to derail their already fragile marriages.” http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/masterpiece/smallisland/characters.html
  • Spoken Word/BCC
    • “Ed Henderson performs one of his spoken word poems, written specially for Black History Month, about the experiences of being black in the UK.”
    • Film: http://www.bbc.co.uk/1xtra/blackhistory/features/video.shtml
  • Sometimes in April (2005) Raoul Peck
    • “Raoul Peck's searing docudrama is one of a handful of recent films to portray the Rwandan genocide of 1994, but Peck's is the first to be shot in Rwanda with local actors and crew. Told in a series of flashbacks, the film stars Idris Elba as Augustin Muganza, a middle-class Hutu with a Tutsi wife. Initially complicit in the bloodshed that goes on around him, Augustin and his family weather turbulent events in a desperate campaign to survive. Photographed with an unflinching eye, Peck's film never relinquishes its African perspective on one of the most chilling events of the 20th century.” http://www.1worldfilms.com/Africa/sometimesinapril.htm
    • Film: http://vimeo.com/25283728
  • Stand in the Sinai (2011)/CNN
    • “As part of the Freedom Project CNN this year returned to Egypt’s Sinai Desert where people-smugglers abuse, rape and hold for ransom desperately poor refugees. In 2011 “Death in the Desert” uncovered evidence that traffickers tortured the refugees, and in some cases harvested their organs for sale on the black market, leaving many of their victims to die. This year, in “Stand in the Sinai” we saw how the battle against the traffickers was progressing and found Bedouins, dedicated aid workers and former refugees fighting the horrific trade in human suffering. Now for the first time you can watch the entire documentary online here in three parts.” http://thecnnfreedomproject.blogs.cnn.com/category/the-facts/
    • Trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zcxGwRIn-2w&feature=player_embedded&list=PLlalCnCLj1RfcRrvQct8pMACeq0l9LxL0
  • Sugar (2008) by Anna Boden, Ryan Fleck
    • “By 2008, more than 25 percent of major league baseball players were born in Latin America. At 19, Miguel "Sugar" Santos, a serious kid from the Dominican Republic, signs with Kansas City. He flies to Phoenix for tryouts and is sent to the Class A team "The Swing" in the fictional town of Bridgetown, Iowa, where he lives with a farm family. Thus begins his odyssey: leaving his mom and girlfriend; living in an alien culture; learning English; overcoming jitters; working hard; achieving early success; navigating friendships, occasional racism, and a woman's mixed signals; dealing with an injury; trying performance-enhancing drugs; and, searching for his place in the world. Will he make it to the Majors; will he play in New York?” http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0990413/?ref_=fn_al_tt_5
    • Trailer: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0990413/?ref_=fn_al_tt_5
  • Surprising Europe (2011), initiated by Ssuuna Golooba
    • “Surprising Europe is a cross medial project: a documentary, a nine partial television series and a website www.surprisingeurope.com; combined to give African immigrants a realistic idea of what Europe is like. In 2003, the very successful photojournalist Ssuuna Golooba gives up his life in Uganda to test his luck in Europe. He uses his house as collateral and manages to obtain a loan. After saying goodbye to his 6 year old daughter and family, he heads out in the search of a better future. Once he arrives in Europe, he quickly realizes that there is nobody here actually waiting for him. He lives in a cellar somewhere and gets by scrubbing toilets. Preferably Ssuuna would return to Africa as soon as possible, but his debt and the potential loss of face, keep him from going back.” http://surprisingeurope.com/press-kit/the-documentary-surprising-europe-the-life-and-times-of-ssuuna-golooba.html
    • Trailer: http://surprisingeurope.com/press-kit/the-documentary-surprising-europe-the-life-and-times-of-ssuuna-golooba.html
  • This Country/BCC
    • “Mildred was born in Guyana. She remembers landing in Trinidad from where she got the boat to the "mother country" England.”
    • Film: http://www.bbc.co.uk/1xtra/blackhistory/features/video.shtml
  • Travelling with Immigrants – Mali (2007)
    • “…In this exclusive report, we accompany a group risking all in pursuit of the European dream. "This is suicide. God protect us", despairs one man. They're only a few hours into their long journey from Mali to Mauritania. Already, they've been beaten by policeman looking for bribes and now their driver is demanding more money. If they don't pay, he'll leave them in the Sahara, 20 km from the nearest town. After three days they arrive near the Algerian border. But some of the immigrants have run out of money. "I'm desperate. I don't know what I'm going to do", laments one. He'll be left at this border town without even money for water. For the rest, the most dangerous part of their journey is just about to begin.”
    • Clip: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VMC3jbQN5gI&feature=relmfu
  • Twelve Disciples of Nelson Mandela (2005) by Thomas Allen Harris
    • “In the wake of his stepfather’s death, Thomas Allen Harris embarks on a journey of reconciliation with the man who raised him as a son but whom he could never call "father." As part of the first wave of black South African exiles, Harris’s stepfather, B. Pule Leinaeng, and his eleven comrades left their home in Bloemfontein in 1960. They told the world about the brutality of the apartheid system and raised support for the fledgling African National Congress and its leader, Nelson Mandela. Drawing upon the memories of the surviving disciples and their families, along with the talent of young South African actors who portray their harrowing experiences, Twelve Disciples of Nelson Mandela tells an intimate story of family and home against the backdrop of a global movement for freedom. A co-production of the Independent Television Service (ITVS), in association with P.O.V./American Documentary and the National Black Programming Consortium.” http://www.pbs.org/pov/twelvedisciples/#.UMiIz6V5nFJ
    • Trailer: http://www.pbs.org/pov/twelvedisciples/#.UMiIz6V5nFJ
  • (La) Vie Sur Terre (1988) by Abderrahmane Sissako
    • “Sissako, a Mauritanian filmmaker living in France, returns to Sokolo, a small and remote village in Mali to visit his father. The arrival of the 21st century is hardly noticed by these people, who are still struggling so hard merely to enter the 20th century. Through this filmmaker’s eyes, Sissako shows us the difficulty of making a telephone call, the parched Mali land and their primitive radio station. The barren legacy of colonialism will pursue these characters into the next century. A moving and poetic contemplation on the relationship between black Africa and the Western world.” http://www.africanfilmlibrary.com/Movies/Video/9345/1002/La-Vie-Sur-Terre
  • (The)Visitor (2007) by Thomas McCarthy
    • “A college professor travels to New York City to attend a conference and finds a young couple living in his apartment.” http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0857191/
    • (Review available at http://movies.nytimes.com/2008/04/11/movies/11visi.html)
    • Trailer: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KY0FEt3mBog
  • Viva Riva! (2010) by Djo Munga
    • “Riva is an operator, a man with charm and ambition in equal measure. Kinshasa is an inviting place. With petrol in short supply in DRC's capital, he and his sidekick pursue a plot to get hold of a secret cache - barrels of fuel they can sell for a huge profit. Of course they're not the only ones who want the stuff. Cesar is a ruthless, sharply dressed foreigner thriving in Kinshasa's lawless streets. A female military officer joins the fray. Even the church will betray its tenets for a piece of the action. But Riva's main nemesis is Azor, a crime boss in the classic style: big, decadent and brutal. He's not a man to mess with, but his girlfriend, Nora, may just be the most seductive woman in all of DRC. Riva catches sight of her dancing at a nightclub and it's not long before Nora matches the fuel cache as a coveted object of his lust.” http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1723120/
    • Trailer: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1723120/
  • White Charity (2011) by Carolin Phillip and Timo Kiesel
    • “Billboards of charitable organisations such as 'Brot für die Welt', 'Welthungerhilfe', 'Kindernothilfe' or 'Care' are omnipresent in streets, on squares, in train and metro stations in Germany. They have a large impact on how Black and white identities in Germany are constructed. The documentary analyses the charity aid posters from a postcolonial perspective. 'white charity' presents different perspectives: based on the charity ad posters, representatives of charities and scientists discuss about development cooperation, colonial fantasies, racism and power structures. 'white charity' is an exemplary analysis of racism in images which has relevance far beyond the horizon of development. It supports a sharper analysis of images in commercials, print and TV.” http://www.whitecharity.de/index_files/Page518.htm
    • Film: http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=kUSMh8kV-xw
  • Yes I Am (2007) by Sven Halfar
    • “A movie about black German musicians: they live in two different worlds. After a black man is beaten to death by a right-wing extremist teenager, they come together and found the musical group "Brothers Keepers". The musician fights with her voice...” http://www.cultureunplugged.com/play/4278/Yes-I%20Am
  • Young Soul Rebels (1991) by Isaac Julien
    • “Caz and Chris run a pirate radio station in East London. When a gay man is murdered while cruising in a London park, Chris is arrested for the murder.” http://www.screenonline.org.uk/film/id/497077/
    • Trailer: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C48N4TBsBdQ

No comments:

Post a Comment