Monday, October 10, 2011

Book Talk @ JJay (RM630): Banished to the Homeland: Dominican Deportees and Their Stories of Exile

An upcoming book talk at John Jay. 
Book Talk

Banished to the Homeland: Dominican Deportees and Their Stories of Exile
David C. Brotherton and Luis Barrios

Following thousands of Dominican deportees over a seven-year period, David C. Brotherton and Luis Barrios capture the experience of emigration, imprisonment, banishment, and repatriation on this vulnerable population.
Date: October 27, 2011

Time: 5:00 PM

Place: John Jay College of Criminal Justice Address: 899 10th Avenue, Manhattan, Haaren Hall

Room: 630 Phone: 212-237-8747


Admission: Free - RSVP at:  guestspeaker@jjay.cuny.edu

"Banished to the Homeland is a provocative, timely, and quite moving work. It explains, in well-textured and clear-eyed detail, how the dreams of so many Dominican immigrants have been turned into nightmares by the grim realities of the U.S. criminal and deportation systems. Brotherton and Barrios have crafted a significant contribution to the emerging fields of deportation and post-deportation studies that should be read by all who care about these widely misunderstood, but most important and compelling subjects." — Daniel Kanstroom, Professor of Law, Boston College Law School

"The main strength of this book lies in its humanity. We are introduced to living, breathing humans with serious stigmatization problems, haunting memories of their homeland, and implacable public institutions that dispense work, education, health care, and social justice. Witnessing the émigrés struggle through these problems is the book's crowning achievement." — Mark Hamm, Terrorism as Crime: From Oklahoma City to Al-Qaeda and Beyond, Indiana State University

"There has been more rhetoric than reason, when it comes to the public sentiment about immigration. This is particularly true with America's deportation policies. We devise and carry out our works as though those who area affected are not really people. Brotherton and Barrios do a superb job of putting a human face on this cold, intentionally harsh practice. With a stunningly ambitious methodology, and an astonishing depth of analysis, this book is a convincing indictment of the way we use deportation as a tool of control, and how it so profoundly fails to reflect core American values of fairness and equality. It is an easy read, and yet an important study for anyone who is concerned about the social meaning of today's globalized capitalism." — Todd R. Clear, Dean, School of Criminal Justice, Rutgers University

"David C. Brotherton and Luis Barrios' Banished to the Homeland promises to be a new classic in the field of ethnographic studies of marginality. By focusing on the tragedy of Dominicans criminalized and banished to an often half-forgotten "home country", Brotherton and Barrios have pointed the spotlight on a range of events that are becoming increasingly more common within a globalized world. Whereas in the Americas, Europe or Asia, "the law" of the colonizers acts like a sort of Moloch continuously feeding itself on and at the same time expelling the "human waste" of the internal colonization processes. A veritable sociological tour de force but also a crucially topical political exposé!" — Dario Melossi, Professor of Criminology, University of Bologna, Italy.

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